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20130216
20130224
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
the sequester going into effect. the same thing happened with the debt ceiling fight and the fiscal cliff. you cover congress. why does everything get dragged out to the very last second? >> well, i think you just answered your own question. we're dealing with congress, and congress loves to wait for the last minute. we saw that with the debt ceiling debate from a couple years ago. we saw that with the fiscal cliff issue where we actually went over the cliff for several hours before congress came in, you know, late at night and early in the morning and voted on a deal. this is going to go, once again, up to the wire -- down to the wire, and, you know, some people are even suggesting that the sequester will hit before congress actually acts. >> now, this week we heard that the president has his highest approval rating since 2009. it seems the worst congress looks, the better he looks. how could that affect gun control reforms and immigration reform? >> there was an interesting poll that came out in "usa today" just yesterday showing that largely the american public agrees with the positions tha
's a debt ceiling, which we thought was going to happen -- four, actually, the fiscal cliff, which didn't happen, that would have been bad. a debt ceiling, which would have been unimaginably horrible, a hell storm of epic proportions. a continuing resolution which could lead to a government shutdown, and a sequester. the sequester is, of these four, probably the least damaging to the economy, the least disruptive, least freakout to the market. there's an advantage to the fact boehner has moved his people to have a fight on the sequester. obama and him are going to have a fight on the sequester and hopefully we'll figure this out before we get to the debt ceiling or something we can't get back out of. there is a sense with a harm mitigation strategy being attempted by john boehner here to try to get his people focused on something, where even if it goes wrong and there's no deal, we don't crash the global economy as a consequence. >> it reminds me of the late 1800s and 1900s when leeching was the preferred medical treatment, bleed it out, bleed it out. that's effectively the strategy tak
. if you remember every time we have come up to whether it's the debt ceiling or first fiscal cliff, at the 11th hour, we had a deal. right now there is a deal in the works. there will be a deal. it will get done. by the way, i predict there will be a deal on entitlements before september. >> did you get that on your iphone prior to the show? >> no, no. i don't ever take talking point from them. but i just tell you, i know politics well enough, i think, to see the two people posturing themselves -- >> the thing is he's hoping the whole country will be under some kind of bizarre hypnosis and think we have money that we don't. >> you speak so negatively -- >> no, no. i do not. >> it's going to be fine.: >> i love this country and i think -- >> we have the ability to try and police ourselves a bit and t stop the wreckless spending and have the courage and fortitude to do so, we wouldn't be in the position we're s in.ou >> it's friday, let's pick it up. look good. >> coming up on "the five," an unbelievable shot. see, this is positive. at a basketball game, and itme wasn't made a by a p
? >> and figured i beat them on the debt ceiling debate in 2011 and beat them on the fiscal cliff, i can do it again. the polls show that the public will be with me. whether that's well-founded, we'll find out, but i think that's what's driving some of this. he feels as if he can win this. >> you think it may be overconfidence on the part of the president, and this is different than the other two fights that jason mentioned, how so? >> it absolutely is. republicans know that they got beat on the debt ceiling and the fact that they're embracing the strategy. it's a deliberate strategy. they're ready and willing to let this go into effect and think of it. step back and what are we talking about at the moment. what we're the not talking about is republicans lack of unity on taxes, we're talking about spending, we're talking about the size of government. we're talking about the president's addiction to spending, we're talking about priorities, this is exactly where the republicans want this to be. >> but could they split over defense spending, kim, where a lot of their members don't want the da
is this is not the same as the fiscal cliff for the debt ceiling where the next day everybody's taxes are going to go up. these budget cuts would happen over time, and a lot of the furloughs would not happen for a month or two months. the next, big budget deadline is march 27, when the continuing resolution will expire, and meeting the will shut down if there is not a budget deal reached by march 27. there is talk of a sequestration deal being rolled into that so that march 27 might be the next deadline to look at. host: poco -- "the new york times" has this story -- "dire forecast on effective budget cuts." here is bloomberg businessweek looking at a reboot for the simpson-bowles plan. are we hearing anything new from them and what has the reaction been? guest: what is interesting is we have not had a ton of reaction from both sides. here is generally what their plan looks like -- 2.4 trillion dollars over the course of 10 years. that is scaled back. their other big deficit commission was around $4 trillion. one quarter of that would come from medicare and medicaid savings. another quarter would come f
. it was in the end game on the fiscal -- on the debt ceiling negotiations in 2011. literally july 27th, 2:30 in the afternoon, jack lew, who's in the white house chief of staff, rob neighbors, the head of congressional relations for president obama, went to see harry reid and proposed sequester. of course, everyone signed up to it, but it was designed to not happen. the cuts were perceived to be so draconian in domestic policy and in defense issues that no one would ever let this happen. it was the super committee, as you may remember, that was supposed to come up with more rational budget cuts. they failed. so we're stuck with -- it's kind of like being on a cruise ship with no power. >> where you have the captain and crew fighting each other and going around in circles. i don't get this, bob. you write this book about how the president and congress talk past each other. we have an election. we hear they might start talking together in a more positive sense. yet, here we have a situation that the defense industry hates, that advocates for the poor hate, that economists hate because you'r
and that was the case with the fiscal cliff deal and the previous debt ceiling fights. on the sequester you're not going to see real negative consequences or a lot of americans potentially losing jobs up until early april at the earliest. that's why you're not seeing a lot of movement on this now. >> lynn, this is how one person is spending his congressional recess, senator marco rubio just announced he is going to join israel ahead of secretary of state john kerry, ahead of the president himself. how should we read this? >> first of all it's telling he didn't say he's also going to the west bank, perhaps he is. most often these trips do include that, that he didn't want to mention if indeed what you showed was the release, that's an interesting angle to follow up on. this is what lawmakers do to season themselves, to become experts. is he not seen as necessarily an expert on international affairs right now and this is one of the areas that you go and by the way, if you wonder why a florida senator would be going to israel, it's because it's a major voting body within the state of florida. there's nothi
in place, but questions about debt ceiling and other continuing resolution and other aspects of the federal fiscal situation which are very concerning and we think pose not only near-term threats to the travel business, but longer term threats to the economy if our political leaders can't get to an agreement. >> it shouldn't be this way. you are picking up in your industry from the brutality of the 2007-2008 downturn. you don't have supply for hotel rooms coming onstream. you should have really good pricing power at the moment. i see that in your negotiations for corporate customers, you expect to increase your room rates by high single digits. are you happy with that or had you hoped for more? >> no, i think -- the frustrating thing about this political situation in washington is business is really good and there are so many aspects of our economy which are not only good for our business, but show broad recovery. so our comp sales growth were up 8% in the month of january and we feel really good about the way that the year has started, which makes this doubly frustrating. the sequestration
ceiling fight coming up again in may. so there's a lot of uncertainty around fiscal policy, around government contracting of all kinds. so it's going to be a sort of rolling snowball effect, i might call it, where it gets bigger and bigger. and by may this may be the only thing we're talking about. >> richard, one could wonder at this point, what was the point of setting the sequester limit if now we're just figuring out ways to come up with a new deal? this was supposed to be the deal. this was supposed to be the thing that forced action. >> right. >> what was the point of it if we're not going to enforce it? >> that's a very good question. what was the point of it? the point of it was that people had crawled out on a limb, and they needed to come off it somehow. the very people who crawled out on that limb are now saying, how did we ever get here? you made me do it. it is ridiculous. and unfortunately, you know, what's that hillary clinton line that she used to use? the definition of madness is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. just in ter
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)